By: Eleni Hale
Genre: YXJ - Personal & social issues: drugs & addiction (Children's / Teenage)
Published by: Penguin Australia
Published: 30 Apr 2018
ISBN: 9780143785613

Description

A heartbreaking novel of raw survival and hope, and the children society likes to forget. A stunning and unforgettable debut YA for older readers.


An unspeakable event changes everything for twelve-year-old Sophie. No more Mum, school or bed of her own. She's made a ward of the state and grows up in a volatile world where kids make their own rules, adults don't count and the only constant is change.


Until one day she meets Gwen, Matty and Spiral. Spiral is the most furious, beautiful boy Sophie has ever known. And as their bond tightens she finally begins to confront what happened in her past.


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Review

Wow! This is a must read novel for older teens, but a word of caution - it is definitely a YA title aimed at teens 15 years and older.


It took me back to my school days reading Go Ask Alice, which I found totally confronting, but at the same time an educational and inspirational cautionary tale. Stone Girl is certainly that as it takes us on Sophie’s downhill journey through institutional care as a ward of the state from when she is 12 until she is 16.


It is written with a real understanding and depth of character, as it is inspired by the real life experiences of the debut author, journalist Eleni Hale. Many dark topics are covered including death, poverty, heartbreak and substance dependence. But shining through the story is identity, survival, resilience and ultimately a coming of age empowerment.


I will not give the story away but suffice to say you cannot help but be swept along by the incredible Sophie, as the world continues serving up crap to her. She often stumbles and is so very nearly broken, but we continue to hold out hope for her throughout the story.


Stone Girls will change the way you look at the homeless, and hopefully enlighten young minds as to the plight of wards of the state.


This is a brilliant debut, but as it does contain extreme language, mature themes and substance abuse, it is suited to older teens, 15 years and up.


Reviewed by Rob